Why you should say no if you don’t match 100% of your prospect’s need

In the good old days, sales people were able to fill their portfolio with stock items and hit the road selling those, without much preferences if customers’ needs fit to that product. But now, customers are demanding 100% solution of their problems.

Some time ago, in a world of never ending market growth, goods had to be produced cheaper and cheaper, driving competition harder and harder. All eyes were focused on how to source and produce to the lowest cost as possible, not what customer really needed.

Customers thought they were needed the offered goods – and for sure, they couldn’t find anything else. And customers were right, not much were changing from year to year or even from decade to decade. Globalization – as we now it today – driven by the internet revolution hadn’t started yet. Companies were pretty happy to source their business with goods available.

Then something happened. A great paradigm shift, from producers’ point of view to customers’.

The introduction of internet started a customer education process. First at slow pace, but soon accelerating. Customers started to get informed using available information and with social media introduction, they were also able to discuss within their networks about their problems and needs, just to get as informed they could before they engaged with a salesman.

Today, this paradigm shift is fully completed. The customer has made himself comfortable in the driver’s seat and decisions are made fully informed. But they still need help to match products with their needs, in detail.

On the selling side, we meet with fully informed customers, so it shouldn’t be any problem – if you are informed at the same level about your products. In my blog post Why Expertise Outperforms Process , I explain why being an expert on your own products or services is mandatory these days.

But my point is, if the salesman’s offer don’t fit 100%, the customer don’t solve 100% of their problems. The result on your customer’s side is not reaching their fully potentials and goals, leading to decreased competiveness. On the selling side, you may lose the deal to a competitor meeting 100% of the needs. Or, have a lot more work to get it. Work including persuasion, product customizations, discussions, motivations an much more hassle to eventually end up with the signed contract.

My advice is simple. Only go for opportunities you know you will solve 100% of your customer’s needs.

puzzle

In an efficient sales process, the first stage – qualification – secures no deal is allowed to pass if not a couple of qualification questions are having positive answers. Common questions are such as if customer has budget, if you talk to the decision makers, if investment is intended in reasonable time frame, if competition is not too overwhelmingly and so on.

“If your product fit” sometimes is one of these questions, but not too often the most important and never the only one. Why? It should be.

Think about the “good old days” when everything you produced could be sold, no matter what. The salesman was king and customers were trusted him as The Voice from the world outside.

Those days could be revived once again, if your product is solving 100% of your customers’ needs and most of your time is spent on helping your customer understand and trust that.

Doing so before you qualify your opportunity in your sales process, will save tremendous amount of hassle and time. But to afford to spend all your time on fit matching, you need to say NO to opportunities that not have any potential to pass the “Fit Test”.

Good luck!

Stefan

 

 

Advertisements

Why Price Is Becoming Everything In Sales

In today’s rapidly changing market landscape, buying decisions are made long before any sales rep is contacted. When you’re finally are being contacted, the only question still left to be answered is the one of price.

Price

My question is: If you’re a sales rep, why bother spending your valuable time on building any relationship if your prospect already has done all evaluation beforehand and only has this single question to you?

No reason at all.

Why not just publish your pricing on your web and you get rid of that last question as well?

Perhaps, I’m starting a revolution within The Sales Community. But I’ve got this topic on my mind for so long. Now, I cannot bear it anymore; I’ve got to start this discussion. My excuses if I’m tend to be a bit provocative.

Some time ago I was planning to build a sundeck to our house. I did my investigation; what type of wood, construction and other materials that we needed. Finally I called a couple of lumberyards for prices. Lumberyards offer exactly the same goods, so pricing was the only thing to compare. I had my favorite – where I used to buy this type of stuff – so I started to call them. It was a friendly and nice conversation, but I decided to buy from a completely new supplier where I hadn’t bought anything from before.

Why? The pricing difference was just a few dollars? Why was the change to a completely new supplier so easy to make, without any chance for my existing supplier to control?

I’m sure the increasingly importance of price is a huge trend, and it’s not just about selecting local lumberyards. Look at the global brands. Ten years ago, I saw major differences between brands. In phone industry a great example comes from the story of Nokia. Technology was more or less the same – the goods was the same – but companies like Samsung or Huawei was lacking the value of a strong brand, which Nokia possessed. You bought the Nokia phone to belong to a hip community. Now, the Samsung brand is one of the strongest on the market and Huawei is the third largest phone company on the planet. Nokia doesn’t even exist anymore.

Look at the Car Industry and you’ll find exactly the same thing; the brand image gap is decreasing very fast and it’s accelerating. KIA, the Korean car manufacturer, was some years ago considered to be cheap and deliver low quality. Today, KIA is one of the fastest growing car companies in the world. Why? Because they are still cheap but it’s brand has recovered to be much stronger diminishing the gap to premium car brands at an accelerating pace.

Another example is Microsoft’s e-mail client Outlook. Only a few years ago, it was considered to be unbeatable and any attempt to get market shares were completely unfruitful. What happened? Well, many companies are now leaving for Google cloud suites and even Windows operating system are now under fire – new Google Chromebooks are all over the marketplace.

Why? Lower price of course.

The last ten years, companies have learned their lessons. Focusing on design, marketing, efficient processes and brand have almost taken away the only weapons available for sales reps to differentiate. In a very near future there will not be any gaps left to work with at all.

The core question is; why would you pay more for exactly the same delivery?

Soon; no reason at all. For now; well, let me pick some reasons you still may come around with a higher price.

  1. Your prospect is lazy
  2. Your prospect is afraid of change
  3. The change itself is costly

Lazy.

Your prospect is not doing any great research on current available solutions and they trust you to be the one to deliver the optimal solution for them.

But the compelling question is: Are there still companies with space in their bottom line to be lazy? If you’re lucky finding them today, certainly you’re not gonna find them tomorrow. So, be aware to change your price level before they are forced to be proactive and reshape their profitability.

Afraid of change.

Most companies manage risks. Even if you’re promoting exactly the same goods but to a lower price than all your competitors, you may lose your deal. That’s because the prospect sets a price on the risk. If they discover any higher risk doing business with you, they judge the risk within a price span, and if you exceed that span it turns out as a price of that risk. That price is put on top of your proposal. If you still are lower in price, you will get the deal but if not, you’ll lose.

Costly change.

In the same mindset, your prospect may add a price of change on top of your quote. They may have to rewrite manuals, set new routines in place, train people etc when changing to your solution. Nowadays, companies take a good look into changing costs much more than before. These “internal” costs is a little harder to collect and estimate but companies are doing more than a guess.

The challenge is to force yourself being lowest priced solution but still earn money. You have to find other sources to get paid. You need to be innovative or you’re out. Great brand creators have followed the trails of making buyers belong to lifestyle communities, but tomorrow you can’t lean on a great brand, since low-price companies have captured and closed the gap of brand value.

You may survive for some years if you are lucky to find companies that are lazy, afraid of change or where the change itself is too costly. But why wait just to die?

Act. Now. Remember: Why pay more for exactly the same stuff?

 

 

Learn from Social Selling to make your e-mails hot

It has happened fast, the shift from using social media in your daily selling. Studies such as this from CEB and Google tells more than one-half of the sales process is gone. Or, more precisely, customers run their buying process at least 57% before they get in touch with a sales rep, in some cases much longer than that.

Conclusion: There’s not much time left to make some impact on your prospects’ decisions.

New social media techniques are therefore essential for your sales success. However, one part of your sales lead production is still left to be traditional, such as sending a prospecting e-mail. It may not be a great part of your sales work and it will definitely be decreasing. But you’d better not ignore it in a foreseeable future.

The challenge is though, partly because of the mentions above, it’s getting harder to create sales leads from traditional methods. So what to do?

Why not turn the knowledge transfer the other way round? Why not learn from recently learned social selling skills and apply those best practise on traditional prospecting as well?

Social selling to e-mail

To do so, you need to define what elements in your social selling that are key to your success and map them to traditional selling tasks. The very best experts in this area is Barbara Giamanco. My own key elements are these five:

  • Curiosity
  • Relevance
  • Value
  • Expertise
  • Ease

Curiosity. Most of us are crazy curious about things we are interested in. You might be interested in discussions in your specific marketplace and what your competitors are doing right now. Social media lets you see what they are discussing and bother about for the moment.

Relevance. In today’s overflow of information you need to be mega relevant when you discuss things. Don’t bother participate in social media discussions or write articles if you’re not relevant.

Value. Only pure customer value counts in social media. Value is measured by the customer, not you.

Expertise. Customers are doing a major part of their buying process without contacting you, but they still need information. They turn to their personal contacts and relevant public information to make their decisions. In social media, it’s easier than ever to be their “personal” contact and provide in depth relevant information.

Ease. In social media you cannot sell. Your only “sale” is a “like”, comment or an accepted invitation on LinkedIn. Easy actions from prospects are connected to a sort of “cost” for them, but it’s affordable low, such as “Yes, I can like this article”, “Well, I should comment on this” or “Fair enough, I can afford to be his friend or contact”.

OK, I will now try to apply my social selling key elements to a traditional prospecting e-mail that turns it from cold to really hot. For some years now I’ve been able to test a method using these social selling key elements in traditional prospecting e-mails with extraordinary results.

In 96% of the cases I’ve got contact and a booked meeting with the right people, access to the decision maker and a list of people that have an impact on my sale.

My method uses both phone and e-mail, and requires three prerequisites:

  1. Cell phone number to the most top manager you can get
  2. E-mail address to the same
  3. At least one success story this top manager can relate to (a competitor to his business is ultimate)

Prepare a short manuscript for leaving a short voicemail (because he will likely not answer your call) to the top manager when you call. Don’t forget to finish with: “…I will also send you an e-mail summarizing what I’ve said for your convenience”. This is just a heads-up when the e-mail arrives and connects to your first sentence in your e-mail.

Now it’s time to compose the e-mail.

Subject line. The only purpose of the subject line is to make the top manager to open your e-mail and should consist of two things and in this order: Relevance + Curiosity. The part of the subject line “Heat Exchangers” makes Relevance (if e-mail sent to top manager in a industrial construction company) and the part “Competitor X” stimulates Curiosity (“what have they done that makes relevance to us…?”).

Example: Heat Exchangers to Competitor X

First sentences in Body. The first sentences in the body will do two things; connect to your voicemail and pitch Value. These first sentences are maybe the only few the top manager will read, so plan your words very carefully. The sentences have to be short and describe the value generally so the top manager easily can understand it. The value has to be relevant to his role, challenges he may struggle with and in words such as money, bottom line, etc.

Example: “I was trying to reach you earlier today but didn’t succeed, so here’s a short summary of my voicemail. As you certainly are aware of, the Challenge B has become a major concern to companies in your industry. As I mentioned in my voicemail, we’ve been working together with Competitor X and by implementing our heat exchangers with our unique feature Y, Competitor X has decreased their total cost by 20% and improved their bottom line with more than 15%. I would like to discuss with you how we’ve been able to achieve these improvements related to your specific business environment”.

Middle body. This part has to be written pretty complex. The reason is that when the top manager starts to read it, he may understand what it is about, but need to involve expertise to determine if it’s interesting enough to spend time on. What will he do?

Yes, of course the top manager will distribute the e-mail to whom it belongs to. And this is exactly what you want!

You want other people impacting your case to be engaged. Also, when anybody later on get in touch with you it might be by forwarding your own e-mail message. If so, you can just scroll down and see all relevant names by reading cc:s etc.

The body should further explain what you’ve done at Competitor X and what more value they’ve got by implementing your solution. You have to show your deep expertise. But please note, I don’t encourage you to reveal competitors’ business critical details and break non-disclosure agreements. Your text in the body should therefore consist of industry details that the internal experts or department managers can relate to and judge to be true and credible, without having you to reveal secrets.

Communication should be in context of “from one expert to another”. This part of your e-mail has to win those experts’ hearts. They don’t easily change their minds investing in new partners or technology, because they’re not embracing change and are definitely prioritizing low risk above most other things. But they also are pragmatists and may be convinced by market leaders. That’s reminds me of the most excellent book in marketing strategy I know, Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey A Moore. It tells the higher relevance you have to their needs and greater market leadership you may prove, the higher chance you’ll get. Maybe you’re not the well-known market leader, but nobody says how tiny markets should be defined…

Finish. The finish will call for action, but in bite size. It really should be “at no cost” to further engage with you. That makes the Ease for them to engage. “Why not, a meeting with this guy only cost us the time of one hour…?”

Example: “I’d like to schedule a one hour meeting at your premises, anytime that fits your schedules and of course entirely unconditionally, where I may further explain what we’ve done for Competitor X and other companies in your industry”. You see, you conclude your message with curiosity as well to improve your snakebite rate…

Now you have to wait. Don’t disturb the process for a while by calling them too early to follow up. My experience is that a minimum “radio silence” of three weeks are necessary for their process to execute. Think about it; there are lots of things you may have set in motion on the prospect’s side: e-mails that have to be forwarded, internal discussions, meetings etc.

So just wait. Your social selling boosted e-mail is hopefully just getting hotter than ever.

 

 

3 stories that reveal if your sales attitude is out of date

It’s not easy to cope with all dramatic changes now happening around how to sell. High performing sales reps do, but my following true stories tell many people within sales and SMB’s still have a long way to go before they would be able to compete in the future.

outofdate

Story #1

In my garden there was until recently a huge red leafed beech. It’s height was almost 60 feet and due to that we couldn’t leave it for another year. We had to take it down. In my former life I certainly was a monkey or such animal, so I went out climbing up to the top, taking down one branch at a time.

One day later I was satisfied with my work. However, the tree trunk was still left. I scanned the internet after firms that could help me taking the trunk down. I called a few local firms and selected one that already the coming Friday was able to finish the work. Being an experienced sales person, I appreciate if a buyer comes back to me, even if it’s just to tell me I lost the deal, so I went out texting those firms that lost my deal.

Here’s the text dialog with one of them:

Me: Sorry, but I have to tell I selected another firm for the job. Thanks for your time anyhow 🙂

The sales rep: Now you lost a lot of money! We’re always 30-40% below our competitors.

Me: (slightly sarcastic) Ooops, then it certainly was a lot of money, maybe several dollars? But you didn’t check all of my needs when you called – I wanted to get the job done already this week… By the way; care about what you’re texting – just a small tips.

The sales rep: I always stand up for what I write or say. I’ve been in business since the 90’s and last year we got 96% of all jobs in your town.

Me: (increasingly upset) Think about if I had another tree I needed to take down? Regarding your attitude, do you really think I would be contacting you again? Blaming a potential customer is not a good choice. I’ve been in sales for a long time and teach sales reps, it might be a good advice to join one of my sales training classes…?

The sales rep: You should consider a training class in Foresight to earn some money!

End of story.

Lesson learned. Always accept a lost deal with a smile and a “good luck”. Look at it as a new opportunity that starts. We all know prospecting takes time and even if you lost this deal, you got in touch and next time it’s a warm call.

Story #2

This story is recently shared from my brother. He had some problems with his chainsaw (I know; you may think we are all in forestry…) and went to a retail store to get it fixed. He asked for service and the sales rep took the chainsaw into his repair shop. The brand was one of those they were selling in the store and the sales rep promised to fix it. But this was what happened next:

The sales rep: OK, I know what’s wrong, we’ll fix it. By the way, where did you buy it?

My brother: (little embarrased) On the Internet…

The sales rep: ON THE INTERNET????? Just go away and take your worthless chainsaw with you! People buying things ON THE INTERNET are not welcome in my store!!!

Lesson learned. Not adjusting your attitude and business to modern buying processes where customers using the internet and social media to educate themselves, buy things and compare, are just out of date. It’s a major threat for SMB’s but not aligning to reality is only stupid. Such aligning might be: “Great, we have a special offer for those buying on the internet, it’s a service agreement for only 99 dollars per year and I can make this included as the first repair. Would you like to fill in this form, please?”

Story #3

This story is a short one, also shared from my brother. His mower was not starting, so he called a local shop to get it fixed. However, the shop was closing at 4 PM and he knew he was a little late calling 4.05 PM:

The sales rep: (first thing saying) Do you know what time it is???

My brother: Well yes, I actually do, but I took a chance and called anyhow; and lucky me, you answered.

The sales rep: We’re closing at 4.00 PM, you cannot call later. Come back tomorrow! Then he hung up.

Lesson learned. Nothing is closed anymore. Business is always open, 24/7. Opening hours are restricting in itself, but here’s the worst thing about the short conversation above: The sales rep was actually picking up the phone. It’s not just missing the call if he didn’t answer, he also damaged his brand and that may be unrepairable.

Recognize any of these stories by your own? Do you have any more examples of out of date sales attitudes? Please tell in the comment line below! Maybe we all as high performing sales reps would get a big laugh at least 🙂

 

Lead profiling – here’s a thought…

Continuing from my last blog..

I was at a lecture on content management and how to drive traffic and I got a concrete tip how to make content into context. You need to create profiles of all the types of people you are trying to communicate to and test the content on them. So the speaker presented Bill (45 year old male who is conservative and believes things when he sees it), Susan (30 year old female who is a straight arrow and calls things on the spot), and so on. Extensive personalities where presented, a total of 10 I think. Every new content was then run against each profile and scored. Based on the scores the company could decide if the where to publish, or change the content. It was very efficient.

This exists in companies that work with internet based sales. Here I find a lot of models, and it is quite clear that this is common here because these clients have made it easy by surrendering their information by beeing on the web and logging on to the company sites sharing age, gender, geographic intel, and so on. So much has happened in internet based sales in such a short time and “traditional” sales need to learn a thing or two…

Sales should have a good idea of what the ideal prospect looks like, what is the best case? By putting together a profile of these prospects, sales can break down what characterizes of the different prospects. What are their pains? How far are they from taking a decision? What level of awareness do they have? What industry segment do they belong to? Did they contact your company? Have they purchased the product/service before? Do they have a contract with a competitor? How price sensitive are they? And the list goes on…the trick is to collect intel.

I found a site with a great example of a way of profiling that makes the profiles feel real and how to present relavent information at the zuyderblog

Then there needs to be a discussion with Marketing around the profiles on how these different profiles will be reached thru different Marketing activities. There might be a profile that your market analysts can see that Sales have never worked with, then Sales need to bring this into their strategy and find a way to sell towards this profile.

Matrix view

The red figures are the profiles created by Sales/marketing and they are placed to show the areas they cover on the market.

Segments with lead profile spread

Each market activity  (A1-A4 in the example below) needs to be matched against the profiles, the score converted into how many % of the profile match the campaign goals and content, and if there is gap the group (Sales and Marketing) can decide that this activity does not have to reach this profile, or the plan might need to be changed to include this profile. I have talked about Demand Shaping before and this will definitely give you means to attempt to shape your demand.

Campaigns mapped against segments and Lead Profiles, pies

Profile diagrams

Another way to do this is to focus on the profiles, set the market asside, breaking them down to 10 key factors:

  1. Buyer maturity, how close are they from taking a descision
  2. Buyer knowledge, from expert to inexperienced
  3. Buyer influence, does the person you are in contact with have the authority to take the descision, from top executive to agents
  4. Company size, is this a big or small company
  5. Product complexity, are the requesting a simple or complicated product/soloution
  6. Level of interest, is the buyers communication frequent, do they respond prompltly
  7. Availability, is the buer easy to reach
  8. Price sencitivty, two what degree is this client pricesensitive
  9. Level of Competition, likelyhood we can land the deal over our competitors
  10. Purchase history, times we got won vs lost opportunities for this company.

The optimal score is 1 on all of these. To describe the perfect prospect: A buyer who is ready to make a purchase and who can take this descision. The buyer has a high level of knowledge and works for a large company, price is not the main issue. This buyer is interested, has reached out and is available to discuss buisness. This deal is not subject to competition, the specifications are standard and the buyer is already a client.

Probably not that common…

By creating profiles with specific target scores you can set  a score on a campaign on what areas it is supposed to target and get a comparison between the profile and the campaign. In this example I have two profiles compared to a campaign:

Campaign Webgraph

In this example I would draw the conclusion that the campaign will be good for Profile 1 in improving knowledge, bringing the descision makers into the purchase process and raise the importance  of our item to ensure good responce rates, For Profile 2 it will bring the small companies  and raise the level of importance of the item. The element in the campaign that intends to raise the interest in the companies is waisten on these profiles as the already have this quality, but there may be some effect.

Collaborate with Operations

This collaboration can easily stretch to include Operations. If there is chaos here, there is a high cost in both Sales and Operations.

Getting companies to see the entire picture is my calling, I hope this can lead to a productive discussion. Looking forward to your opinion.

Leadcycle, improved

Starting in the right end – marketing and sales collaboration

As usual I have been reading up on what is going on and I came across this blog post: Marketing Bingo – You Might Be Playing And Not Even Know It. I have never been part of working within Marketing, so there might be something I’m missing, but for me Kyle makes a good point. Work from the outside in…

I started to think about how I percieve marketing, wich is more inside out: Who are we selling to? Is this changing? Can we see any trends? What precision can we expect in the conversion from Lead to Opportunity? How do we segment the market? How do we process the leads when they come in (different approaches based on segmentation)?

From a B2B sales perspective, the marketing actions need to create leads or make the lead creation possible. In order to give the sales organization a fair chance to sell, the leads need to be half decent or the customers need to be interested. There needs to be a common approach on the pipeline effeciency, in my view this is Gross Margin, taking all costs in account.

I made a model (probably exists but I could not find it anywhere) I would like to get some feedback on:

Sales, Marketing, Market mix

If Sales and Marketing create a plan that does not reach the intended market they have an “Ineffective Strategy”. If Marketing reaches the market, but these recipients never come in contact with sales, then we get “Uncaptured Lead”. If Sales work the Market in order to reach the quota and land prospects without the support of the Marketing we have a “Lead Deficit”. When Sales and market work the market in the same area we hit the “Sweet spot”.

Companies need to find a way increase the collaboration between sales and marketing to get better at targeting the sweet spot. First of all you need to have a common picture of what market looks like, what you want to achieve and how this transforms into customers.

An example

If we look at how this can be done, let’s start with a segmentation of our customer:

Segments

Let’s say that S1 is Low price/Low complexity, S2 is Low Price/High Complexity, S3 is High price/Low complexity and S4 is High price/ High complexity.

If we study our customers purchase behavior the last 12 months we find that we have a strong tendency to land in the S4 segment:

Segments with customer spread

Looking the Marketing we are targeting the following area:

Segments with customer and marketing spread

Looking at this picture it is easy to see that there is untapped potential. What needs to be cleared out is if Marketing I over reaching / targeting the wrong market, or if Sales are missing out on Prospects because they have the wrong approach to the market. Wouldn’t you like to know why and correct the situation?

My thought is to try and move the circles by increasing the collaboration and  achieving a higher efficiency in the sweet spot = more results with less work:

Changing the Sales, Marketing strategy

Stay tuned…a blog comming up on the topic of “Lead Profiling”, how to increase the “sweet spot”…

Niche marketing defeats large competitors

Just finished reading David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell. In the book Gladwell tells how apparent weaknesses instead may be to your advantage. Gladwell references to research regarding successful entrepreneurs having dyslexia in larger extent than others. Resistence and difficulties, Gladwell tells, are driving forces seeking alternative and maybe “odd” ways to success in life and business.

Another example in David and Goliath is Caroline Sacks – a very talented student with top results all years until she went for University studies. She chose between Brown and Maryland for studies in Science. Brown is one of those elite schools, while Maryland is only “good”. Sacks chose Brown.

Sacks loved science, but after just a short while she left University without finishing her studies. Why? According to Gladwell she found herself not being the No 1 for the first time. Gladwell points out if Sacks had chosen Maryland she had still been in Science; it’s better being a big fish in a small pond than a small fish in a big lake.

It’s like niche marketing – being a market leader in a tiny vertical is many times regarded as a successful strategy. Reconnecting to my blog post Strategy Myopia (inspired by Marketing Myopia by Theodore Levitt) I was discussing companies’ strategy defined too narrowly. However, that’s may not always be true for Marketing.

According to Geoffery A Moore, and theory of Crossing the Chasm implies that marketing in very niche segments to achieve market leadership is essential for fast and organic growing.

Moore points out success against established competitors requires seeking niches where you can be The Number One and act from that point. Why? Because most buyers hates risk and therefore prefer established market leaders.

The tricky part is to find a very tiny vertical, but with potential adjacent – and tiny too – niches to expand to. Moore describes this as The Bowling Alley, where the bowling pins are the niches. If one pin falls, it’s likely some of the adjacent will fall too. The result is a wider market leadership managing several niches in one big, recognizing you as The Number One. Pragmatic and Low Risk Buyers start turning to you instead of their former established suppliers.

Summarizing, the process starts when you are under pressure and you think about giving up. Difficulties and inferiority are really good things; they are the sparks thinking differently, finding other ways. Such way may be your first niche. Having a wider strategy, you would think of several adjacent verticals, but you start only with one. Select one where you got good customers with strong success stories.

Best Regards
Stefan

Download the Sales Scenario App for iPad.