Do you know your sales costs to reach your sales plan?

In an industrial society, sales costs were negligible. Sales was easy to perform when demand was ever-increasing and focus was on how to produce as efficient as possible to meet demand. Now, the paradigm shift is happening with full power where customer is the new king, leading to exploding competition and harder to sell. Not only new competitors through globalization have seen the daylight, but also new methods like e-commerce gain market share at the expense of human based sales forces.

For those organizations that stick with their sales force, sales costs are peaking. The problem is that they just don’t know how to attack them. To decrease cost, companies use the first weapon they see – to fire sales reps. That’s because salary is the only clear choice there are. But at the same time they do, revenues decrease as well.

My standpoint is, firing healthy sales reps is a totally wrong action. Why?

Because the cost of sales salary is minor compared to sales overhead costs. Before, in an industrial society, a product calculation consisted almost only of costs that directly could be connected to a specific product, such as salary for workshop workers and material needed for producing the product. All overhead costs, like the cost for sales, were very small compared with production salaries and direct material costs.

Now, in a post-industrial society, the situation is the reverse. Overhead costs, such as sales costs, are in many cases dominating the product calculation. Many products have over 80% defined just as “overhead costs”.

So, firing a sales rep for the reason of cost is not an efficient way to improve your sales department. To decrease your sales costs, you need to get into those “sales overhead costs” to really understand how to improve.

The challenge is that these overhead sales costs are hidden by a “cost fog” with no or very little transparency. But it shouldn’t be that way. I’m involved in the expertscenario initiative which propose a solution to remove the overhead fog and providing a way for your organization to implement continuous improvements and, finally, be able to attack the massive overhead costs.

sales overhead costs

The initiative, with methods like Post-Industrial Accounting Models and Management Models can be applied to all areas in your company, as well as value chain. Overhead sales costs are just one example. To make this example as clear as possible, the initiative has created an app where you may put in your sales plan – such as target revenue, average order size, no of sales reps, hitrate etc – and simulate your sales costs by the process stages Lead, Appointment and Quote, to fulfill your plan. You may also get into the details for each of the stages, to see how sales costs are distributed on different sales tasks, like meeting time, travel time, quote creation, segment prospect database, sales review etc. Very useful to start changing how to work with things in your sales process.

A certain sales plan gives specified costs not only per process stage, but also updates your product calculation, so are able to see how profitable (or not) your current products are, with sales overhead costs taken into account.

sales costs

The app is not yet launched, but you may get a great feeling how it will be working in a preview.

The app, as well as the models the expertscenario initiative provides, removes uncertainties about what costs that truly affect achievement of your sales plan. In the same perspective, you cannot overlook investments you do within your sales organization either. It may be investments in “soft” refinement such as strategy, process, human resources, CRM etc. Today, most of these investments are accounted upfront – the entire investment the first year – as an overhead lump sum. Instead, the right thing to do would be to spread the investment on several years the investment contribute to the value for the sales organization.

A clear picture of what sales costs you really have is still covered by the overhead fog. Why this is done, I don’t really know, but one clue is the fact that people sometimes don’t like to be measured too much. Better then, thinks leaders, to just spray those costs over entire organization than actually get the picture of what’s working and what’s not.

Believe it or not. It’s soon 2018…and still we are hiding from the scary truth…

The good news is that all I’ve written above is within the framework of GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and the models were already featured in The Hidden Treasure Chests (1993), written by Bert-Olov Bergstrand and Christer Lundgren. The Hidden Treasure Chest has the Swedish Association of Graduates in Business Administration and Economics signature.

 

 

 

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Learn from Social Selling to make your e-mails hot

It has happened fast, the shift from using social media in your daily selling. Studies such as this from CEB and Google tells more than one-half of the sales process is gone. Or, more precisely, customers run their buying process at least 57% before they get in touch with a sales rep, in some cases much longer than that.

Conclusion: There’s not much time left to make some impact on your prospects’ decisions.

New social media techniques are therefore essential for your sales success. However, one part of your sales lead production is still left to be traditional, such as sending a prospecting e-mail. It may not be a great part of your sales work and it will definitely be decreasing. But you’d better not ignore it in a foreseeable future.

The challenge is though, partly because of the mentions above, it’s getting harder to create sales leads from traditional methods. So what to do?

Why not turn the knowledge transfer the other way round? Why not learn from recently learned social selling skills and apply those best practise on traditional prospecting as well?

Social selling to e-mail

To do so, you need to define what elements in your social selling that are key to your success and map them to traditional selling tasks. The very best experts in this area is Barbara Giamanco. My own key elements are these five:

  • Curiosity
  • Relevance
  • Value
  • Expertise
  • Ease

Curiosity. Most of us are crazy curious about things we are interested in. You might be interested in discussions in your specific marketplace and what your competitors are doing right now. Social media lets you see what they are discussing and bother about for the moment.

Relevance. In today’s overflow of information you need to be mega relevant when you discuss things. Don’t bother participate in social media discussions or write articles if you’re not relevant.

Value. Only pure customer value counts in social media. Value is measured by the customer, not you.

Expertise. Customers are doing a major part of their buying process without contacting you, but they still need information. They turn to their personal contacts and relevant public information to make their decisions. In social media, it’s easier than ever to be their “personal” contact and provide in depth relevant information.

Ease. In social media you cannot sell. Your only “sale” is a “like”, comment or an accepted invitation on LinkedIn. Easy actions from prospects are connected to a sort of “cost” for them, but it’s affordable low, such as “Yes, I can like this article”, “Well, I should comment on this” or “Fair enough, I can afford to be his friend or contact”.

OK, I will now try to apply my social selling key elements to a traditional prospecting e-mail that turns it from cold to really hot. For some years now I’ve been able to test a method using these social selling key elements in traditional prospecting e-mails with extraordinary results.

In 96% of the cases I’ve got contact and a booked meeting with the right people, access to the decision maker and a list of people that have an impact on my sale.

My method uses both phone and e-mail, and requires three prerequisites:

  1. Cell phone number to the most top manager you can get
  2. E-mail address to the same
  3. At least one success story this top manager can relate to (a competitor to his business is ultimate)

Prepare a short manuscript for leaving a short voicemail (because he will likely not answer your call) to the top manager when you call. Don’t forget to finish with: “…I will also send you an e-mail summarizing what I’ve said for your convenience”. This is just a heads-up when the e-mail arrives and connects to your first sentence in your e-mail.

Now it’s time to compose the e-mail.

Subject line. The only purpose of the subject line is to make the top manager to open your e-mail and should consist of two things and in this order: Relevance + Curiosity. The part of the subject line “Heat Exchangers” makes Relevance (if e-mail sent to top manager in a industrial construction company) and the part “Competitor X” stimulates Curiosity (“what have they done that makes relevance to us…?”).

Example: Heat Exchangers to Competitor X

First sentences in Body. The first sentences in the body will do two things; connect to your voicemail and pitch Value. These first sentences are maybe the only few the top manager will read, so plan your words very carefully. The sentences have to be short and describe the value generally so the top manager easily can understand it. The value has to be relevant to his role, challenges he may struggle with and in words such as money, bottom line, etc.

Example: “I was trying to reach you earlier today but didn’t succeed, so here’s a short summary of my voicemail. As you certainly are aware of, the Challenge B has become a major concern to companies in your industry. As I mentioned in my voicemail, we’ve been working together with Competitor X and by implementing our heat exchangers with our unique feature Y, Competitor X has decreased their total cost by 20% and improved their bottom line with more than 15%. I would like to discuss with you how we’ve been able to achieve these improvements related to your specific business environment”.

Middle body. This part has to be written pretty complex. The reason is that when the top manager starts to read it, he may understand what it is about, but need to involve expertise to determine if it’s interesting enough to spend time on. What will he do?

Yes, of course the top manager will distribute the e-mail to whom it belongs to. And this is exactly what you want!

You want other people impacting your case to be engaged. Also, when anybody later on get in touch with you it might be by forwarding your own e-mail message. If so, you can just scroll down and see all relevant names by reading cc:s etc.

The body should further explain what you’ve done at Competitor X and what more value they’ve got by implementing your solution. You have to show your deep expertise. But please note, I don’t encourage you to reveal competitors’ business critical details and break non-disclosure agreements. Your text in the body should therefore consist of industry details that the internal experts or department managers can relate to and judge to be true and credible, without having you to reveal secrets.

Communication should be in context of “from one expert to another”. This part of your e-mail has to win those experts’ hearts. They don’t easily change their minds investing in new partners or technology, because they’re not embracing change and are definitely prioritizing low risk above most other things. But they also are pragmatists and may be convinced by market leaders. That’s reminds me of the most excellent book in marketing strategy I know, Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey A Moore. It tells the higher relevance you have to their needs and greater market leadership you may prove, the higher chance you’ll get. Maybe you’re not the well-known market leader, but nobody says how tiny markets should be defined…

Finish. The finish will call for action, but in bite size. It really should be “at no cost” to further engage with you. That makes the Ease for them to engage. “Why not, a meeting with this guy only cost us the time of one hour…?”

Example: “I’d like to schedule a one hour meeting at your premises, anytime that fits your schedules and of course entirely unconditionally, where I may further explain what we’ve done for Competitor X and other companies in your industry”. You see, you conclude your message with curiosity as well to improve your snakebite rate…

Now you have to wait. Don’t disturb the process for a while by calling them too early to follow up. My experience is that a minimum “radio silence” of three weeks are necessary for their process to execute. Think about it; there are lots of things you may have set in motion on the prospect’s side: e-mails that have to be forwarded, internal discussions, meetings etc.

So just wait. Your social selling boosted e-mail is hopefully just getting hotter than ever.

 

 

Get 100% Prospecting Response. How?

This post is also available on the Blog Radio.

Every sales rep is looking for maximal response on his actions taken. But much of his actions leaks out with no revenue. The result is higher sales costs per time unit and a lot bad buzz and frustration among sales people, stressing around trying to reaching quota by using quantity measures instead of quality in actions.

Wouldn’t it be relaxing if you know that every action you take will lead to a certain goal? What would such actions be? Is there some sort of best practise?

I’m not sure if there is a sort of best practise. However, I’ve been using a technique that works every time with perfect results. But it’s like walking on the tightrope; if you do one detail wrong you will fall hard.

Tightrope

Some requirements are needed, but surprisingly few:

  • Cell phone and e-mail address to the prospect’s highest level top manager
  • At least one great success story describing a competitor to the prospect

See, it’s not much. If you don’t have sold exactly the same product or service to the prospect’s competitor, it’s not a big problem, but it will be a little easier later on. The important is, however, that you’ve sold anything to the competitor.

But maybe you say: “it’s a lot of work to get the cell phone and e-mail to a CEO…”. Well, it depends on how you see it. Is it better to waste a hell lot of more hours spent on actions that not lead to anything more than nothing, so go ahead…

OK, so you got the cell and e-mail? Good, now why. Here’s a common misunderstanding. That the CEO will answer when you call or reply to your e-mail. He will not. And why should you then spend much energy search for his number or e-mail? I’ll try to explain.

First of all, prepare a pretty detailed e-mail – but don’t sent it yet! Everything has to be in the exactly right order as I tell you!

The subject have to include your competitor’s name. This is really important, don’t miss that. The body text in the e-mail should in detail describe what you’ve been doing at the competitor’s side and the positive impacts they have got thanks to your solution. Write the text as it was targeted to the business user of your prospect. If you sell CRM systems, the detailed body text should be written for a sales manager, not the CEO. If you sell heat exchangers for industries, the text may be targeted to a maintenance manager. It’s important that the text describes advantages that helps that type of business user.

When you’re ready, save the e-mail (still do not send!). Now it’s time for preparing the phone call. Prepare it for a voice mail situation, because the CEO will not answer when you call. He’s too busy.

The phone call voice mail have to be informative. Not only who’s calling, your number and please call back. Remember, so far you’re a complete stranger to the CEO. You have to present what your reason is for contacting him and – for God’s sake – don’t forget to mention your competitor’s name! It’s also important to end with the phrase: “…to sum up, I will also put together an e-mail for you”. That will legitimates to send it and also, even if the CEO has thousands items in his inbox, in some sense makes him aware that “I haven’t got to remember all of what this stranger might say right now”. He will also have the feeling it’s so much info in your voice mail – and his competitor is mentioned – that he definitely will keep an eye on his inbox.

Easiest is to simply write down on paper what you’re intending to say, so you’re not having a black-out when it comes to “…please leave a message after the beep”.

So, after you’ve prepared the e-mail and the voice mail, it’s time for action. Pick up your phone and call the CEO, have your prepared voice mail text available. In 99% of the cases, the CEO will not answer, but if he against all odds does, don’t be afraid: You’re well prepared to say your message.

When the voice mail is recorded, don’t wait to send your prepared e-mail to the CEO.

But then you have to wait. My experience says about 2-3 weeks before any response. This is opposite to all other sales techniques that require pretty immediately contact. But I’m sure you have to wait much longer. Why?

Because this will happen: The CEO scans his unread e-mails, typically at least once a day. He reads the subject line only and most of the e-mails he just leave as unread or moves to trash. But when he comes to your e-mail it’s different. He stops because he read his competitor’s name in the subject line, which causes him to open the e-mail of two reasons; he is – as everybody else – curious and he is afraid to miss anything about his marketplace that would cause him to be left behind in the business race. He feels it’s worth the price to read your e-mail.

Since the e-mail is not written for him – it was written for the business user  – he may think the e-mail is too complex to understand or he will understand, but sees instant action is required. Both cases are good for you.

So. The CEO hasn’t got time to act himself, but he thinks it has to take action upon. The e-mail is therefore forwarded to the business user, sometimes with c/c to several more people in the CEO’s management team. Count on that you will be contacted within some weeks by the business user or somebody else in this group.

Congrats! Your topic is brought to awareness in the entire management team, the further contacts with your prospect is supported from the highest level and your name is presented to all of the people you need to talk getting your deal closer.

And now. Your real sales work can be started.

Passion Makes Excellence In Sales, Too

Did you know one of the most successful songwriters and producers is Max Martin, the man behind numerous hits by Taylor Swift, Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson, Pink, Backstreet Boys (yes, I’m really so old…) and incredible twenty-one No 1 on the Billboard list?

What is his burning flame? What are his key success factors? If we can define them, may we translate them to a sales environment as well?

Passion in heart

Let’s give it a try.

Definition No 1. Learning the craftmanship.

Recently I read an interview with Max Martin in the swedish newspaper DI Weekend (interview is in swedish) by Jan Gradvall. Max Martin invited passionated young people to his studio to “get the right feeling” for years. The “pupil’s” work tasks included making coffee and other basic alternative boring tasks, not connected to music at all. But they consumed the atmosphere, the culture in the studio. They learned the details the hard way by just being there. Why would talented producer wannabes spend that enormous amount of time just making coffee? One reason is of course the fantastic opportunity to meet famous pop stars. Wouldn’t it feel nice serving a cup of coffee to  Bon Jovi ? But that’s not my point. To produce a song going to the top of the Billboard list, it requires craftmanship.

In sales, the craftmanship will start being a sales or marketing assistant to senior sales pros or learn from them by listening or reading their books.

Definition No 2. The fuel is Passion.

To learn to be a craftman it takes years – and blood, sweat and tears. If you like to be a famous producer, being in an environment like Max Martin Studio would be the perfect place learning perfection. To cope with daily coffee making I believe you have to have a lot passion for music. The passion is the fuel you will be putting into it, it’s your investment in your education.

What is passion in sales? Of course, it’s the love of talking to prospects and customers, but I think of it on a little higher level. It’s the every-day moments in your life. If you choose a crime novel before you go to bed in the night instead of a sales book by Dave Stein, you probably haven’t got the sales passion. But if the shoe size of your prospect’s CEO does matter to you, you’re on the right level. If you are taking classes in your spare time (instead of watching a movie or playing softball) to learn more about the prospect’s business environment, you are on track having sufficiently high content of passion in your blood.

Because there are no short cuts creating perfection. And you will need perfection to exist in a never ending increase of competition.

Take care / Stefan

 

 

Why Expertise Outperforms Process

Our home has a kitchen that is divided into three different sections. Not very well planned at all and now we’re gonna make something about it. Two heavy walls will be demolished making room for a large kitchen in one single space.

We’ve got in contact with two different suppliers. The first one really caught us. The salesman listened to us, asked a lot questions and, finally, when he presented his layout proposal for the new kitchen we totally gave up. It was fantastic and, even if it was over half a year to when we had to make our decision, we thought we already had made our selection of supplier in our minds. He told us about the process forward, the steps towards the order and after that, the installed kitchen. It was obvious he followed an established sales process – I can see his checkboxes and drill-down questions in front of me. As a sales executive myself, I admit I liked it.

We thought we had met a structured and professional salesman. Indeed, we were in safe hands.

The second supplier also asked some questions, but was more quiet when it came to present her solution. She just sent it by an e-mail, and asked us to just pick up the phone if we’ve got any questions. Her solution was overall much the same as the first; it met our needs and wishes very well. However, we regarded the presentation of her solution as more or less a copy of the first supplier’s one and paid not that much attention to it, because we were so overwelmed by the first charismatic, process driven and professional salesman. The second one didn’t get a real chance to stick in our minds.

Several months later it was time to get into the details. You know, all those detail decisions to make: colors, appliances, equipment, knobs, countertops….etc. If you’ve any time been done a such big project as rebuilding a kitchen in your home – or any other major renovation in a house – you certainly know what I’m talking about. For sure, you can’t do it alone. You need an expert to talk to.

  
And now the expertises of the two salesmen were revealed. The first one – the charming sales guy we fell in love with – he just didn’t manage the situation. All those hundreds of detailed questions we had to get answers to, were left to general responses, references to their website, guesswork or just not responded at all.

In the beginning of this intense decision making phase we, first just to be polite, we asked also the second supplier these detailed questions. All in all, she had put a lot work into her proposal, so why not? But her answers were rapidly back to us with advices from a real expert attached. Sometimes we couldn’t phrase our questions by ourselves, but then she did it for us. Several times one answer led to another question we couldn’t tell from start but the answers came timely, accurate and always with a smile.

In the end we found ourselves completely impressed by her and extremely sure our new kitchen will be just as in our dreams. Of course we selected her as supplier.

How come the first guy didn’t make it? Actually, he did all well by the book. He got a fantastic sales process to follow, told all prepared questions, was charming and made the social game to excellence. I think most salesmen in the world are molded in that way. The creepy part is also that management follows up in this way, so no salesman can leave the beaten track – one size fits all…

No room for a Barefoot Sales Process at all.

To be honest, what went wrong? Of course, the first salesman didn’t had the deep knowledge of what he was selling. And here’s my point: Expertise outperforms process. Everytime. The tricky part is how to find salespersons with that expertise. Think about it; it’s an engineer in a salesman’s suite. That’s really hard to find. 

In general you’ve got two options; 

  1. Train an engineer to become a salesman
  2. Train a salesman to be an expert on what he is selling

To establish (1) is nearly impossible and providing product knowledge on an expert level to a salesman as in (2) takes long time and is really costly.

Instead, I’ve got an easier (?) suggestion. In my Blog post Sales people are heroes – how can we help them I mentioned three properties that distinguish a Super Hero in sales from an ordinary one:

  • Extremely high creativity skills
  • Very interested in customer needs
  • Huge skills doing “matchmaking” between that need and the products or services that would be delivered (with several twists of course).

What I mean is, try to be CLEAR about your work descriptions and to SUPPORT your sales heroes, so they are able to provide:

Answers rapidly back to her prospects with advices from a real expert attached.

Then your prospects perception of your salesmen will be as real SALES EXPERTS.

Best Regards 

Stefan

The Ultimate Sales Boom – Have You Done Your Toothbrush Test?

All sales people are looking for easy sales. When the customer buys – not you selling. No matter what, the customers seem to flow into your order books without any effort at all.

You’re in the Tornado.

The term “Tornado” is perfectly defined by my favorite marketing author Geoffery A Moore; author of the bestselling book “Crossing The Chasm” and following “Inside The Tornado”. In the serie of books Moore dicusses how to bridge the chasm in the technology life cycle between visionaries and pragmatists by defining your smallest niche and buildning a bridge-head on the pragmatist’s “Tornado” shore of the chasm using a bowling pin strategy. In my blog post Niche Marketing Defeats Large Competitors I go a little deeper in this topic of how. Interesting though that’s a lot of efforts and may take good piece of time.

And – more important – that strategy was introduced long before the social medias were born.

Nowadays we have examples as King (Candy Crush Saga) and more companies that really take advantage of the social media technology for their success. I’m pretty sure Candy Crush hasn’t been that huge success without Facebook. What’s new is that King builds the social media into the business model itself.

In Candy Crush Saga, Facebook is not a fancy add-on, it’s literally the true salesman for aquiring new users, collaboration between them and of course building the loyal community that will continue to spend time and money in the product.

Well. You may say this would only apply for consumer products or services, not B2B. I think it can, at least for digitial services. And if you do your Toothbrush Test.

Toothbrush

A toothbrush test is a way of testing if your product is used frequently enough to change peoples lives. You’ll not gonna change somebody’s life if your product is used one or twice a week. But if your product is so compelling or desirable that people will use it as often they brush their teeth – in average two times per day and as a habit – then you will have a good starting point for a tornado.

Then it’s a question of how large your target group is – how many people would change their lives using your product. It doesn’t matter if your product is even so amazing for your favorite customer, if it’s not applicable to more than them.

A couple of weeks ago I visited Singularity University in Silicon Valley. Their mission is to research in and inspire leaders to apply exponential technologies to address humanity’s grand challenges. To change the lives of billions of people. I learned, if you want a massive tornado, start change your perspective: For how many can my product change their lives? And in what way?

Here’s the paradox; you need to narrow down your idea to a tiny vertical, but the customer need have to be valid for many more people than in this initial vertical to get a tornado in place. As it’s told in the book “Crossing The Chasm” you first become the market leader in one verical and then, maybe after years, the adjacent verticals will fall as bowling pins since they have identical needs, and at the end creating that tornado.

Of course you haven’t got that time. You want the tornado now. The toothbrush customer need is your key to very fast create your tornado.

To succeed, you need to switch your perspective looking more at customer need than features you have in your existing product. To start, ask the following questions to yourself:

  • Can you narrow your business idea to fulfill one single core need?
  • Would that fulfillment change the lives for many people you’re targeting?
  • Will your product be used (at least) twice a day?
  • Is it easy to make it a habit? Gamification has the potential to add stickiness to your product in a whole new way
  • Is your product easy to share or – better: is the social medias a part of your service and business model?

Happy to be with you today, we’ll keep in touch!

Stefan

Sales People Are Heroes. How Can We Help Them?

Think of a Super Hero – free of choice: Batman, Superman, Spiderman – or why not Bruce Willis as Super-Cop John McClane in the first Die Hard movie from 1988. They challenge the evil and saves the world from disaster. They overcome dire straits, get into serious trouble, but at the end leaves the rest of us with peace and an astonishing admiration. Many times The Hero him/herself sneaks away, without notice from the crowd. 

In Sales, our Super Hero is the sales rep. How many times haven’t I heard those stories about how this man or woman literally saved the whole company. How the Big Order was brought home, regardless of what hurdles there were to pass.

I remember many years ago when the largest company in my hometown (at that time) was struggling to survive. Over 1,000 jobs were at stake. The company was selling large pulp drying systems and it was needed to fill the order books. Luckily, there was a RFP from Indonesia out to go for and the negotiations were to be held on site. It was extremely hot whether and three sales teams on the short list; the Americans, the Germans and our team from Sweden.

The potential customer turned to the sales teams in order, but kept going around with the teams without giving any clues which team that was in pole position for the order. If there would be an order at all. Customer didn’t say much at all. Everything was uncertain. And it was awfully hot. Meetings were fifteen hours per day, the questions were few. Still murdering hot. 

  
The team from German went home after one month – thought nothing would happen anyway. And on site there was less happening than ever before. The heat was really sucking. The American team gave up after one month further – there will never be a contract anyway, better to come back later?

For more than three months the Swedish team stayed before they got the signature on the contract. Back home, the sales manager was interviewed by the local newspaper:

– Congratulations recieving a new order, Mr Sales Manager!

– Orders are not recieved. They are taken.

How many of us are just expecting the same from our sales reps or sales managers? Orders should be recieved, regardless of market conditions, competition, product fit, or timing. Do we really know – in all aspects – what it takes to take – or almost “steal” – orders in extremely though circumstances? I’ve got a long experience as a  sales rep by myself, but I think there is not any salesman that is equal.

The role being a Super Hero is highly individual. But there are some key features that remains the same for all:

– Extremely high creativity skills

– Very interested in customer needs

– Huge skills doing “matchmaking” between that need and the products or services that would be delivered (with several twists of course).

Still, I believe we may be able to help him or her. We should be right by their side when they have questions. We should be positive to hear what he/she has going on, leaving encouraging comments, promoting somewhat “crazy” ideas. Nevertheless, those ideas are the next customer need to fulfill. Either we do it or it will be fulfilled by our worst competitior. It’s valuable information for the entire company.

But the best support we can give, are our expert advices, our mentorship. That’s the most valuable for our Super Heros. Would you like to provide that?

Best Regards

Stefan