Real Customer Need Is Not What They Are Telling You

I’ve just started to use my new Apple Watch. It was an unexpected gift on my recent birthday. My first thoughts was:

  • What will I do with such thing?
  • I don’t wear any watch at all
  • Actual time is always displayed on my mobile’s lock screen

Today, that little thing is one of my best friends. And that happened in about four weeks. How did that happen?

Watch

The answer is of course Apple showed me an alternate behavior I couldn’t resist. As I know Apple they are excellent of showing alternate behaviors. The best – and most discussed – example is of course the introduction of iPhone 2007.

At launch, most people said a lot about the iPhone – it’s was too expensive, too bad to make calls, too slow, etc… But when the war was over, it was named The Invention of The Year in 2007 by Time.

In 2007, the market for smart mobile phones was completely dominated by the Nordic companies Nokia and Ericsson. They made phones evolved from a history of making just that – phones. They hadn’t the culture to create anything but phones. Of course, there were some alternatives – but who remember Microsoft CE nowadays…? A compressed windows interface into a small screen, delivered along with a stylus pen. Microsoft claimed it’ll be the way to go, since people would like to have the user interface just like the same as in user’s PC.

In summary, the dominators’ proposal was either to use just phones or micro-sized computers on mobile devices. What Apple created instead, was a new behavior for a lot of people, ending up by taking  the computer into the streets.

Exactly the same happened 2010, when Apple launched the iPad. I remember my words of wisdom; “OK, I have an iPhone and a PC; why should I bother to buy an iPad?” We all know, Apple took the PC to the couch, giving internet surfing it’s natural place or to the kitchen creating a fast and convenient way of searching and reading baking recipes. Again, Apple changed our behavior.

To learn from this stories in your everyday selling, you have to stop think about the needs your prospect tells you about. To make you successful, you have to make your prospect successful – that’s the usual way to go in all sales. To accomplish that, you will have to investigate harder not what they tell you they need today based upon what they see in the near future. You have to propose to them where you think they have to go to change their customers’ behavior.

It’s not enough to make them successful today, to be the one they hold on to in the future. You need to visualize for them what they need tomorrow to get major competitive advantages.

Just as simple as that, Apple Watch changed my behavior in many ways, for example while running. I can follow my pulse, average pace, distance and at the same time discuss my new sale with a colleague. All data collected and summarized in nice presentations compared to my health and business goals.

Apple took my office into my running trails – and gave me additional productive time while keeping my body in good shape. That’s a success for me. Think of what successes you would like to provide to your prospect’s customers in the future.

Only then you will be successful as a salesman.

 

 

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Don’t Ask The Customer: Do Your Homework

Today was the third day in a row a sales person called and made exactly the same mistakes, ended up too suddenly.

Hi, I’m Paul. I’m calling from The Company X. Can you tell me who is responsible for Marketing in your organization?

Just a short sentence. I heard some background noise as well, imaging he was in a room where many people were doing the same as him.

It wasn’t abnormal. It was a typical sales call, but ended up in the same way as the other recent calls I got this week. I hung up. I never do such otherwise, except if I’ve not having time at all. I learn from bad and good sales people, just spending a few minutes, to get a fresh experience of how sales reps are working nowadays, to get the stories of behavior and to perfect the advice I give to sales and business leaders.

research

This week wasn’t a bad one. And I wasn’t in a bad mood at all. Still; I couldn’t stand the way these sales persons called. It was so many faults.

So, can you “Find Five Faults”?

First.

When you call, go to a quiet place. If I hear other voices, I think of two scenarios – both are bad. Either the working environment is too bad for the person calling: “are they really so many employees so close to each other?” or – and more obvious: it’s a call center guy with a list to call. So my feeling is that I’m devalued, only being a row in a list. If he doesn’t catch me, it doesn’t matter, he’s just going on calling…

Second.

He didn’t know my name. Addressing by pronouncing the receivers name means he want to speak with me personally, not my role or position.

Third.

Don’t ask for anything if you’re not giving something first. The sales rep asked me to give him the name of my marketing manager. Why should I? What do I get in return? A ticket to the cinema or theater? It connects to the Third as well: He don’t want to talk to me, just my role. To bad for him, since I am the marketing manager…

Fourth.

Do your homework. You may find most information about my company on the internet. As a sales rep, if you don’t have the time to spend a couple of minutes scanning my web to get who is the marketing manager, you probably not are having time to help me either. You will take my money and go away. I understand, sometimes the information on the net can be somewhat scanty, but again, that’s no problem. There’s lists to buy. If you can’t afford buying a list of names – I recognize that as a not solid enterprise you’re calling from.

Fifth.

Begin your call by mentioning a pain you know – and I mean really know – the prospect has. Even if most of the sales process is gone nowadays, the buying process is still ongoing. Take part in your prospects’ searching for help and best practise, using social media channels. Learn to be a helping star and you will get close enough to hear their biggest pains.

Don’t take me wrong here. I really care about you sales reps out there. I’ve been a rep by myself and I know the hard work you have to do. But why are you walking a path full of thorns?

Good luck out there!